gingerhaze

historical-nonfiction:

Welcome to Derinkuyu, an underground city that once housed up to 20,000 people. In the Cappadocia region, famous for its cave dwellings and underground villages, Derinkuyu stands out for sheer size and complexity. Locals began digging in the 500s BCE. The city consists of over 600 doors, each of which can be closed from the inside. Each floor could be closed off as well. And just to make attacking completely impossible, the entire city was deliberately built without any logic. Its maze-like layout makes navigating the city nightmarish for unfamiliar invaders.

thisiscaucasian
shackway:

Fountain on the edge of town in Gyumri, Armenia.  This must have been quite impressive when it was still working.  The location seems strange, but there was probably a plan to expand housing in this part of town before the 1988 earthquake struck.  In the background there is a large apartment building that was largely destroyed by the quake.  
Before the earthquake Gyumri had a population of 300,000.  The quake killed about 30,000 people and many others left, so now the population here is about 100,000. There are many beautiful 19th century buildings, some half destroyed and many that have been repaired.  There are many people still living in provisional housing, with others living in apartments that were built after the quake by the Germans, Austrians, Americans and others.  
The Soviets also started building apartments but construction stopped on those buildings when the USSR fell apart, so now there is a whole neighborhood of spooky unfinished apartments from 1989 surrounded by grassy fields.

shackway:

Fountain on the edge of town in Gyumri, Armenia.  This must have been quite impressive when it was still working.  The location seems strange, but there was probably a plan to expand housing in this part of town before the 1988 earthquake struck.  In the background there is a large apartment building that was largely destroyed by the quake.  

Before the earthquake Gyumri had a population of 300,000.  The quake killed about 30,000 people and many others left, so now the population here is about 100,000. There are many beautiful 19th century buildings, some half destroyed and many that have been repaired.  There are many people still living in provisional housing, with others living in apartments that were built after the quake by the Germans, Austrians, Americans and others.  

The Soviets also started building apartments but construction stopped on those buildings when the USSR fell apart, so now there is a whole neighborhood of spooky unfinished apartments from 1989 surrounded by grassy fields.